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Woh saat din: The hit-miss test!

Published On: 2015-08-11

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Woh saat din: The hit-miss test!

 

Source: DNA

Date: July 14, 2006

 

‘Fanaa’ has reportedly grossed Rs 90 crore in two weeks while ‘Krrish’ did a business of a whopping Rs 120 crore. If these figures are anything to go by, clearly, today a week is all it takes to determine if a film is a hit or flop.

Komal Nahata, editor, Film Information, is quick to point out the reason for these super fast returns. “Multiplexes are the main drivers of this phenomenon, ” he says. While earlier there would be just about 18-20 shows in one day, now there are 40-45 shows a day.

 

The fact that Bollywood is doing extremely well overseas is also contributing to this relatively new trend. Says trade analyst Amod Mehra, “The Indian movie business has grown in leaps and bounds. The ticket rates have also gone up. The money earned by one multiplex theatre in a week is equal to what is generated by four and half single theatre halls in the same period. For the record, ‘Krrish’ was shown in 52 theatres simultaneously — approximately 300 shows per day! “

 

Mehra says that piracy is also a major reason why filmmakers are clamouring to release as many prints as possible. “The shelf life of film has radically reduced over the years. Also, people have no patience. Earlier, a popular film song would be played on the radio for 25 weeks. But now even a ‘Jhalak dikhla ja’, which was released about four months’ back, seems old,” adds Mehra.

 

Taran Adarsh, editor of Trade Guide, agrees. “A film these days can be safely declared a hit or a flop just by the first week collections because of the increase in the number of shows. Also, a film that has done well in the first week obviously won’t do very badly in the second week,” he explains

 

Maulik Shah, a business management consultant who saw the movie in North Carolina, found "Krrish" lacking.

 

"Compared to other Hollywood and even Asian movies, it wasn't up to par," he said. "You could tell that they didn't spend as much money on it and it wasn't creative enough. But I can see how it's a success because this is the first of its kind."

 

Rohit Karn Batra, who watched the movie recently at the Naz8 Cinemas in Artesia, thinks differently: "A lot of heart went into making it a good story and commercially viable. And I thought the character of Krrish was more three-dimensional than the character of Superman, who was more of a prop to me. With 'Krrish,' there were story lines and Indian values. It's a multilayered character, and much more developed than 'Superman.' "